Thursday, June 30, 2016
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Snowy Mountains Local News from the Capital Radio Newsroom

Another horse found shot to death in Snowy Mountains

Another horse has been found shot to death in the Snowy Mountains.

The animal's body was discovered over the weekend on a farm just outside Adaminaby.

It follows the discovery of  six wild horse carcasses at Long Plain in the Kosciusko National Park several weeks ago, and five, including a pregnant mare, across the Victorian border.

Monaro Local Area Command Chief Inspector Michael Trambie, says its concerning that it appears illegal hunting is still a regular occurrence in the region.

"There was also a number of kangaroos that were found deceased around the horse too- so obviously someone is getting onto properties and illegally shooting so we'll be having a look at that over the next week or two, to see if we can gather some more information and try and find out what's going on- track down who it may be, and if they are on there illegally then we can take action against them," he said.

 

 

Dashcam footage shows near collision on Monaro Highway

By LOUISE AYLING 

Police are urging motorists to be patient and take extra care on the roads, following the release of dashcam footage showing a vehicle within seconds of a head-on collision with a truck on the Monaro Highway.

The footage recorded on Friday shows a white ford attempt to overtake a vehicle at about 130km/hour before swerving out of the way of oncoming truck by only millimeters.

It was recorded outside Cooma by truck driver Richie Gillman, who told ABC news its a common occurrence on the Monaro highway.

He said a truck travelling behind him called over the radio "you're kidding, look out", before the vehicle shot past.

Monaro Chief Inspector Michael Trambie says the truck driver has contacted police, and the Cooma branch are hoping to liaise with him to try and get further information, and possibly identify the motorist.

He says motorists need to be patient along this stretch, with the arrival of the ski season, and an increased number of vehicles along the road.

"The opportunity to overtake will come when the overtaking lanes present themselves. You need to be patient, and take your time, you will get to where you're going- you might not get there as quick as you want to- but you will get there," he said.

 

Call to arms for peaceful brumby protest in Snowy Mountains

By LOUISE AYLING

A brumby advocate has made an impassioned plea to local residents to join a protest opposing plans to almost eradicate wild horse numbers in the Snowy Mountains.

The Riverina's Lynette Sutton set up camp with a friend outside the gates of Long Plain in Kosciusko National Park on Wednesday to campaign against the state government's proposed wild horse management plan, aiming to reduce brumby numbers from 6000 to only 600 over two decades.

She says its also a way to monitor what the national parks and wildlife service do, when winter arrives.

"Since I've been involve in brumby rescue- since 2010, every year the gates of Long Plain are locked and anywhere between 300-600 brumbies are passively trapped. Very very few get re-homed, there's no funding for re-homing groups, so it limits the amount of horses that can be taken and saved and trained and rehomed, and the rest go for either human consumption to Peterborough abattoir or they go for pet food," she said.

She says their vigil has now ended for personal reasons, but they'll be back in force as soon as they can for as long as necessary, and they want as many people to join their cause as possible.

"If they'd like to join the Facebook page- 'Snowy Mountains Bush users Group- pretty much everyone's on there chatting. We've had great support, we've had some amazing people visit us in the freezing cold and pouring rain, bring us hot food, and firewood.

It doesn't have to be a camp overnight, if you can spare a day to come and sit up on the gates, share some awareness. Its not something that should just affect horse-lovers, it should affect every Australian," she said.

Call to arms for peaceful brumby protest in Snowy Mountains

By LOUISE AYLING

A brumby advocate has made an impassioned plea to local residents to join a protest opposing plans to almost eradicate wild horse numbers in the Snowy Mountains.

The Riverina's Lynette Sutton set up camp with a friend outside the gates of Long Plain in Kosciusko National Park on Wednesday to campaign against the state government's proposed wild horse management plan, aiming to reduce brumby numbers from 6000 to only 600 over two decades.

She says its also a way to monitor what the national parks and wildlife service do, when winter arrives.

"Since I've been involve in brumby rescue- since 2010, every year the gates of Long Plain are locked and anywhere between 300-600 brumbies are passively trapped. Very very few get re-homed, there's no funding for re-homing groups, so it limits the amount of horses that can be taken and saved and trained and rehomed, and the rest go for either human consumption to Peterborough abattoir or they go for pet food," she said.

She says their vigil has now ended for personal reasons, but they'll be back in force as soon as they can for as long as necessary, and they want as many people to join their cause as possible.

"If they'd like to join the Facebook page- 'Snowy Mountains Bush users Group- pretty much everyone's on there chatting. We've had great support, we've had some amazing people visit us in the freezing cold and pouring rain, bring us hot food, and firewood.

It doesn't have to be a camp overnight, if you can spare a day to come and sit up on the gates, share some awareness. Its not something that should just affect horse-lovers, it should affect every Australian," she said.

Rain to turn to snow by end of week

By LOUISE AYLING 

The Snowy Mountains have received a lashing of rain associated with the notorious east coast low weather pattern, but authorities say the worst seems to be over for the state's alpine region.

Perisher received 54 millimeters of rain, with Thredbo receiving 39 millimeters, and 36 recorded at the Cooma airport in the 24 hours to 9am this morning.

Bureau of meteorology forecaster Gabrielle Woodhouse says the pattern is now moving into Victoria, although we can expect the rain to stick around for a short time with reduced falls.

 

"The east coast low is just in the far east of Victoria, so we've just seen it cross into Victoria and we've seen most of the rainfall clear from the eastern side of New South Wales, but there is still continued rain on and west of the ranges.

For today and tomorrow we're looking at some more rainfall- probably just between 5 and 10 millimeters, but we do have a couple of cold fronts crossing the state this week, one coming across tomorrow, and other towards the end of the week," she said.

The first is predicted to push through Victoria and New south wales, bringing a healthy 5-10cm to the peaks. 

This will then be followed up on Friday and into Saturday by the strongest cold front of the season, with the Alpine region on track for over 30cm of fresh powder.

Man rescued from freezing Thredbo River

By LOUISE AYLING

Police have rescued an individual who fell into alpine waters in the Snowy Mountains, injuring himself in the process and rendering him unable to escape its icy grips.

The 30 year old man was fishing alone on the Thredbo river around 3.20pm on Wednesday when he slipped and fell into the river, hurting his back and causing his waders to start filling with water.

He called triple 0 and emergency services arrived and treated him on scene for mild hypothermia.

He has thanked the police and paramedics for their assistance in a heartfelt post on the Jindabyne notice board on Facebook.